Weekly Luncheons

Willamette Falls Riverwalk Project – July 23rd

Willamette Falls Riverwalk

Date/Time:
Tuesday
July 23rd, 2019
12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Location:
The Sentinel
614 SW 11th Ave, 3rd floor
Portland, OR

Andrew Mason is the executive director for Willamette Falls Trust, the nonprofit organization created in 2015 to promote a world-class experience for everyone at Willamette Falls. He has been with the Trust since April 2018.

Mason previously served for 22 years at Open School, a Portland-area program that re-engages marginalized youth in their education. Open School expanded tenfold during Mason’s tenure and opened a new school in east Multnomah County as a capstone to an intensive racial equity initiative. Mason previously served as a consultant and staff member with Oregon Youth Conservation Corps programs, and was the Education Coordinator at The Wetlands Conservancy. He has a strong background in fundraising, strategic planning, program development, executive leadership, public and private partnerships.

Mason holds a Bachelor of Arts from Reed College and a Master of Social Work from Portland State University. He’s a runner, a dedicated Buddhist, and looks forward to a strong lamprey run this summer.

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Brian Moore joined the Willamette Falls Legacy Project as Project Manager in October 2016. Prior to joining the project team, Mr. Moore was Director of Planning for the Optimum Group in the Los Angeles area where he successfully developed infrastructure projects on tribal lands. He has led major waterfront redevelopment efforts along the Columbia River for the City of Richland, Washington, and in the private sector, worked toward the restoration and redevelopment of abandoned and active industrial sites in California. He holds a Masters in Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles, and BAs in Economics and Dance from the University of California, Riverside.

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Carol Mayer-Reed is principal-in-charge of landscape architecture and urban design at Mayer/Reed.  Mayer/Reed is a 30-person Portland-based design firm providing landscape architecture, urban design and visual communications services for the environments in which we live, work, learn and play.

Carol is a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects.  Her 35+ years of experience covers a wide array of project types in both the public and private sectors.  Urban design projects include waterfronts, stormwater systems, transit, parks and recreation facilities, trails, sustainable mixed-use projects, and campuses.

Carol and her team were part of the Willamette Falls Riverwalk Concept Design; and are continuing to participate as landscape architects in the Phase 1 design and construction. They are currently working with stakeholders on a light watercraft portage trail around the falls.


Peacebuilding Starts With Friendship – July 30th

Headline instead of Page Name

Date/Time:
Tuesday
July 30, 2019
12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Location:
The Sentinel
614 SW 11th Ave, 3rd floor
Portland, OR

Through a partnership with Creating Friendships for Peace (CFP), Portland Rotary has been given an opportunity to hear from three pairs of Israeli and Palestinian teens.  Join us on Tuesday, July 30th to experience what six teens have to say about their home countries, their personal challenges, and what it takes to bring peace to their part of the world.

Creating Friendships for Peace (CFP) is a volunteer grassroots organization whose mission is to promote and strengthen friendships between teens from divided communities and extend those friendships to their families and friends.

CFP’s approach for building friendships, trust and respect can be summarized as “Partnering and engaging teenagers from divided communities age 15 – 17”.

The friendships are developed through home stays with American families.  Each family hosts two teens – one from each side of a conflict.  The teen pair shares a bedroom and learns about each other.  They develop an understanding of their different perspectives and realize that friendships can develop despite significant political and cultural differences.  With friendship, an atmosphere is created that allows for mutual respect and understanding – a key ingredient for peace.

 

Current Programs:  Cyprus Friendship Program and the Jerusalem Friendship Program

In  2018, CFP began a new model for expanding its outreach.  Rather than develop a presence in a divided country first, CFP decided to expand by partnering with other peacebuilding organizations that bring teens from divided countries to U.S. camps.  CFP provides the hosting experience to further develop friendships which were begun in the camps and works to extend those friendships to the teens’ families and friends.

CFP’s first partner is Jerusalem Peacebuilders (JPB), a non-profit organization that promotes transformational encounters among the peoples of Jerusalem and Israel/Palestine.  CFP provides Israeli and Palestinian teens from JPB summer programs the opportunity to live in American family homes as “peace pairs” for two additional weeks. Through social gatherings, community service and environmental projects, the teens deepen their understanding of each other.

 

Why Israel/Palestine?

The proximity of Cyprus to Israel and Palestine and the similar cultures in the region make it easier for CFP to expand into Israel/Palestine.  The partnership with the Jerusalem Peacebuilders makes it possible for CFP to give the teens in this region and their families new opportunities to learn about each other.

We all know that Israel/Palestine is fraught with challenges that have global impact.  As in Northern Ireland and Cyprus, CFP can help change the attitudes of people 2 teens at a time, by fostering trust, respect and friendship that would not occur without CFP.

Cyprus is a key interface between the Christian and Islamic worlds.  While the current conflict is not based on religious differences, peace in Cyprus can offer a model elsewhere in the Middle East. Through expansion and partnership with Jerusalem Peacebuilders, CFP can now have an even greater impact in this region.

U.S. families hosting CFP teens in their homes show the goodwill, caring, and generosity of Americans. The strong relationships that develop between the host families and teens result in bonds between Americans and communities in the Middle East, both of which in recent decades have been strained.

Those in Cyprus and Israel/Palestine who seek friendship greatly appreciate the involvement of volunteer Americans who are without a political agenda and who treat their communities, their cultures and their beliefs, with equal respect.  The teens’ cross partition friendships extend to their families and friends.  As they learn about one another an environment of team-building and trust is created, leading ultimately to peacebuilding by one or two teens at a time.


OHSU 2025 – August 6th

OHSU 2025

Date/Time:
Tuesday
August 6th, 2019
12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Location:
The Sentinel
614 SW 11th Ave, 3rd floor
Portland, OR

Dr. Danny Jacobs is the fifth president of Oregon Health & Science University. He is an advocate for the values rooted in public academic health centers like OHSU, with its mission to serve all Oregonians and its commitment to innovation and adaptation to meet community needs.

Before joining OHSU, Dr. Jacobs was the executive vice president, provost and dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. He previously led the departments of surgery at Creighton and Duke University.

Dr. Jacobs grew up in rural Arkansas. He received his medical degree from Washington University-St. Louis and completed his residency in general surgery and specialty training at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He also earned a master’s of public health degree from Harvard.

Among other accolades for public service, Dr. Jacobs has received the President’s Award from the National Medical Association.

Dr. Jacobs is an avid cyclist who enjoys fly fishing and hiking. He is married to Nancy Jacobs, a nutritionist and Oregon State University graduate, with three grown children and three grandchildren.


Saving Endangered Species – August 13th

The Surprising Tools the Oregon Zoo Uses to Savve Endangered Species

Date/Time:
Tuesday
August 13, 2019
12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Location:
Oregon Zoo
4001 SW Canyon Road
Portland, OR 97221

**DO NOT SHOW UP AT THE SENTINEL HOTEL!! WE WILL BE MEETING AT THE OREGON ZOO!** Please RSVP using the link above (members & guests!)

Are we gaining ground in the battle to save endangered species? Are today’s zoos making a difference? Learn where the Oregon Zoo is seeing success and where it will focus efforts in the coming years. Dr. Don Moore, Oregon Zoo director, will share stories of three of the zoo’s very different approaches to saving endangered species using tools uniquely available to zoos.

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Dr. Don Moore is a zoo-based endangered species conservation specialist and animal behaviorist, who has been leading and training the next generation of animal care professionals and conservation biologists for over 30 years. Dr. Moore currently works as Director of the Oregon Zoo and as a Smithsonian senior science advisor on strategic initiatives and living collections sustainability. He has developed strategic plans based on animal welfare and safety for Oregon Zoo and for zoos and aquariums around the world. He most recently led Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s Animal Care Sciences’ team of veterinarians, curators, keepers, nutritionists and animal behavior professionals, providing excellence in animal care and wellbeing for the zoo’s cherished animals. Prior to working at Smithsonian, Dr Moore worked as a curator, Animal Enrichment/behavior Programs leader and director in Wildlife Conservation Society’s zoos and global conservation programs in New York City. Dr. Moore has led and participated in professional training workshops on animal welfare and behavior and zoo design, management and AZA Accreditation Standards, animal welfare and wildlife management techniques, and ecotourism, in a variety of countries including the US, Canada, Uruguay, Peru, Argentina, Spain, and Malaysia. He has a special interest in the conservation and well-being of large mammals including deer, bears, Asian elephants and others, and has studied sloths, amphibians, reptiles and birds as well. Dr. Moore has a PhD from the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) from Syracuse University’s Maxwell School.